Cape Gazette
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Rehoboth Public Library mixes science, fiction and fun

Sciencetellers recount mysterious dragon adventure
By Taggart Houck | Jul 21, 2014
Photo by: Taggart Houck Kids laugh and smile as storyteller Doug Cashell dumps gaseous dry ice for the finale of a story using fiction and science.

Rehoboth Beach — The Rehoboth Beach Public Library served as a platform for energetic theatrics, with a touch of science along the way for nearly 30 eager kids July 11.

The Sciencetellers, a small group based in New Jersey, intrigued the children with chemistry experiments that tell fictional stories to children.

The program breaks learning barriers, Scienceteller Doug Cashell said.

Cashell, 31, enthusiastically explained the story of “Dragons and Dreams,” in which two villagers embark on a journey to release dragons and find the mystical Horn of Fire in order to save their kingdom. The 45-minute story used volunteers in the audience to turn dry ice into its gaseous form, create an explosion using a water jug with fire and ethanol, and cause dishwasher soap to bubble and overflow from a beaker.

Children in the audience sat on the floor, smiling and laughing during the story time while most of them threw their hands in the air to volunteer for experiments. They learned that in its gaseous state, dry ice is not harmful and safety lessons like always being cautious around fire, especially when ethanol is involved.

Cashell says the best part about the kids participating in the story is it keeps it fresh.

“Dragons and Dreams” will be told by another Scienceteller 3 p.m. Thursday, July 24 at the Lewes Public Library.

The group mixes science and storytelling at anything from birthday parties to camps. For more information go to www.sciencetellers.com. The library put on the show as part of its Summer Reading Program Performing Arts Program, made possible by the Delaware Division of Libraries.

Scienceteller Doug Cashell catches the attention of a young audience after beginning the mystical story of a journey to release dragons. (Photo by: Taggart Houck)
Alexander Undorf, 6, bravely volunteers to hold a beaker overflowing with gaseous dry ice in the beginning of the "Dragons and Dreams" story. Kids learned that dry ice in its gaseous form is safe. (Photo by: Taggart Houck)
Aaron Tikiob, 6, left, and Brian Wangel, 6, are intrigued as dragon breath shoots out from a flask. The mystical breath is actually dry ice in its gaseous form. (Photo by: Taggart Houck)
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